Monday, March 24, 2008

Fantasy Room






The current issue of Vogue Living has a great article on a fantasy room created for actress Rachel Weisz. Inspired by the lives of 19th century Parisian courtesans, Weisz wanted a boudoir with a salon feel. The fantasy room, created in the empty apartment of the late Fernando Sanchez, was assembled with the help of Vera Wang and designer Jessie Carrier. And what fun that must have been! The room is dominated by a gorgeous bed dripping in fabric by Michael Smith and crowned by ostrich feathers!

So, I started to think about my kind of fantasy room. Now in reality, I'm a student of the "Albert Hadley/Billy Baldwin/ Van Day Truex with some Dorothy Draper mixed in" school of design. But we are talking fantasy here, so why not go for broke. I don't see myself creating a period piece- Regency England, Belle Epoque Paris, or Renaissance Italy are all very inspiring periods, but they're not striking my fancy at this moment. And I don't want a costume drama. Although Scarlett O'Hara is a heroine to us Southern gals, I'm just not seeing hoop skirts in my fantasy room (although allowances might be made for Scarlett's green velvet curtains; they just might come in handy!).

No, my room would be planted firmly in the 20th century; actually, the 1930s to be exact. I see satin, mirror, interesting plasterwork, a bit of Chinoiserie, and moody lighting. It would have to be shot in black and white for that extra touch of drama. Oh, and I see an ermine cape thrown on the ground for that touch of devil may care attitude.



If we're talking 1930s, we have to include a Syrie Maugham room. Perhaps a satin sofa like this might be nice, although the fringe is a bit hard to stomach.


I suppose this might be my fantasy bathroom, located next to my fantasy room. (Bathroom at Gayfere House, London)


What about these unusual ropes, wooden tassels, and porcelain hands on a wall in the fantasy room? (Images from House & Garden, Conde Nast Store)


You see, nothing like a little dramatic lighting to change the tone of a room. (Room designed by Thedlow; House & Garden, August 1936)


Oh look, there I am striking a pose in my fantasy room! (Photo of late actress Gail Patrick)

(Images at top from Vogue Living, Spring/Summer '08; Annie Leibovitz photographer)

23 comments:

  1. My fantasy room would be the grotto-style dining room that Suë et Mare designed in the 1920s for Daisy Fellowes ... mirrored furniture, rocky grotto-like architecture, and phosphorescent paint that glowed and sparkled in the dark! God it was fabulous. Oh, yes, and it had curtains made of entirely of glass beds and a massive glass wall that sank into the floor at the touch of a button, allowing guest to walk into the garden.

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  2. Gail Patrick!...She was so great in My Favourite Wife.

    Porcelain hands on the wall...love it...very Cocteau.

    The 1930's! I think I'll add Holiday and The Women to my Netflix Queue.

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  3. Great time period for a fantasy room! I just love the 1930's movies where the men and women dressed in formal attire to go out to a club for the evening and then retired to oppulently furnished apartments. So glam!

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  4. I love it love it LOVE IT!!! Thank you for bringing a bit of style to me each week. I love your blog and keep checking in to see what fun things you have posted. You have FAB taste - of course, you are a southern gal...

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  5. Jennifer,
    Excellent job describing your fantasy room. You vividly mention every chic thing I associate with you :)

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  6. OK Aesthete... produce some images!! That sounds unbelievable! A glass wall that sank into the floor? Amazing.

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  7. Oh beautiful images -that bathroom is DIVINE. The room from vogue living is pretty fabulous too -i had heard that magazine was awful, but I may have to check it out now!

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  8. Paul- Me too! Loved her! She was one of the prettier actresses too.

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  9. Linda- I agree; I think they had more fun too!

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  10. Life's Humor- Thank you!! I appreciate the kind words :)

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  11. Be the Change- I actually liked this issue of Vogue Living. I've been away from the blogosphere for the past week so don't know what others are saying. Will have to check that out, though.

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  12. Jennifer - this was a great layout. I had also missed the buzz on VL, but thought there were some definite high points. It wouldn't hurt if the images were a bit bigger, but Mayer Rus (one of my favs) has a column (as yet unread) and I'm happy he has found a home - at least for now. Wonderful post - I can just see you there.

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  13. Patricia- So happy Mayer Rus is back!! I've really missed him. His articles for H&G were fantastic.

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  14. Jennifer~
    I could picture what you're describing as your fantasy room in a scene on Poirot or in a young London socialite's apartment on Miss Marple. Very glamorous and sophisticated.

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  15. Anne- Or in "Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day"!

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  16. i too would go for a very 1930s streamlined deco look. what a wonderful post! i am now daydreaming of rooms that once were and could be....cheers. lovely blog.

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  17. Wonderful! I think 30's design would make a great fantasy room. My intro to deco came early: my granmother has a gorgeous deco ring and lots of deco pieces inherited from her parents. There is something so cheeky and smart about that era - all the wink-wink dialogue to disguise forbidden things (like liquor consumption during prohibition). The decor has a personality of being both serious, classy, and spunky. It also manages to be both masculine and feminine.

    I'm going to have to get the Vogue Living! That room looks awesome.

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  18. Emily- I think you summed up the spirit of 30s design perfectly!

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  19. Rachel's boudoir is stunning! I'm a huge fan of 1930s design as well with Art Deco and Hollywood Regency. Awesome post!

    Karen

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  20. A visit to Eltham Palace left Mrs. E. and me dumbfounded. We immediately started making plans to acquire lots of deco furniture while in London. And then we started doing the math. Couldn't even afford the lemur's furniture.

    Great post and you're playing our song! What a joy to read. (And speaking of a joy to read... just finished your profile on 1stDibs! As I told Mrs. B... BRAVA!!! Richly deserved. I'm glad to see that your vocation and avocation have coincided so nicely. Elegant to a fault.)

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  21. Aesthete, I believe I know someone who had dinner there. That glass wall sinking into the floor so they could wander the garden after dinner has a familiar ring to it.

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  22. E&E- Thank you... you're making me blush ;)
    Yes, nothing like high prices and a bad exchange rate to burst one's bubble!

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