Tuesday, April 19, 2011

A Deep Purple Medley





The Baton Rouge house featured here is quite attractive, don't you think? It's light and airy, and yet the layering of antiques and objects gives the home substance. Those white walls and upholstery certainly help to bring the homeowner's artwork, books, and bibelots into sharp focus. So much so, in fact, that in almost every photo, my eyes immediately zoomed in on the cut Hydrangea. How stunning are those mopheads in that rich, blue tinged shade of purple? Hydrangea in shades of white and green seem dignified and even a tad matronly (I mean that as a compliment), while periwinkle and pink show off Hydrangea's fun-loving side. But the deep purple seen here? Va-va-voom!













All images from Southern Accents, May/June 2009, Antoine Bootz photographer. Interior design by Jeff Woosley.

14 comments:

  1. I have a large collection of hydrangeas, well over fifty different varieties, but do not have a very deep purple. In addition to the genetics of the plant, the mineral balance of the soil is critical for the color of the bloom. You will be seeing almost black blooms, very striking in arrangements when combined with light colors, but more in the floral trade for cut flowers and small pots, than in the nursery trade.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I've never seen hydrangeas in that deep purple. Amazing!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love the hydrangeas, but those velvet beds combined with the Italian commode are making me very jealous. I think that our garden in Mexico had hydrangeas of almost that intensity--I believe that the gardener added a lot of lime to the soil?

    ReplyDelete
  4. I love that slipcovers are being used in more formal rooms.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Beautiful Hydrangeas -- not at all like the plants growing in my yard! I love seeing them in the settings you showed. What would a room be like, painted in that color? Well, a particular kind of room,at any rate.
    Another view of Hydrangea is the new full spectrum paint color from EcoHues, a different Hydrangea story for sure. Thanks for the gardening tips!

    ReplyDelete
  6. My fav flower- fresh or dried! And those twin beds are fabulous!!

    ReplyDelete
  7. That color is beyond gorgeous! Love how hydrangeas always look so classic and full. xx, L

    ReplyDelete
  8. decorators Insider1:15 PM

    Jennifer adored those hydrangeas from Baton Rouge but the interesting thing would be to find out what they add or what do they have in their soil that produces that fabulous color. As a gardener we know about aluminum sulfate and lime and their effects on hydrangeas but what produces that Purple color .I will never forget in on my first visit to Brittany from Quimper to St Brieuc the hydrangea's were darkest red carmine possible with bronzey lime toned leaves just thrilling . They would also been divine dried many thanks for showing us Lemeau Decorators Insider

    ReplyDelete
  9. I wish that I knew more about gardening so that I knew how the grower achieved that purple. Maybe I'll do a little research...

    ReplyDelete
  10. Oh gosh, the colour of those hydrangeas are swoon-worthy! They really pop in that space! Also, how gorgeous is that kitchen table though??

    ReplyDelete
  11. Love that chinoiserie chest in between the beds too!

    It is all about the soil with hydrangeas!

    Wonderful post!!!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Anonymous8:32 PM

    I've never seen hydrangeas that color. Beautiful! And, that photo of the kitchen with that table & the marble! Wow!

    Karen T.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Jennifer, for purple hydrangeas you can start with a plant that has been developed to be red, such as Cardinal Red. The conditions are better controlled if it is grow in a container that is adequately watered. To make the blooms darker, treat the soil for two years in the Spring by dissolving two tablespoons of aluminum sulfate in a gallon of water and pouring the solution onto the soil. You will probably not want to do this more than twice unless there is a repotting after five years. Also each Spring for the life of the plant, scatter 1/4 cup of powdered sulfur on the soil around the plant. It could easily be two or three years to get the desired effect, so you'll have to stick with it. And as with anything in nature, there are no guarantees.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Classicist- Thank you for the instructions! It doesn't sound too terribly difficult. Wonder if I should attempt it?

    ReplyDelete