Monday, May 24, 2010

The China Syndrome




I need more china like I need a hole in my head. But still, I can always come up with justification for just one more pattern. The one I've been smitten with as of late is Tiffany's "Framboise Rose". The pattern was part of Tiffany's Private Stock, meaning it was hand-painted in France and...that it was very pricey. Not an issue, though, as I believe the pattern has been discontinued. It's odd, really, that I'm even drawn to this pattern. You have to admit that the pattern is pretty feminine, and I tend to prefer more "gender neutral" china. I do like the color pink, though not so much on my table with the exception of flowers and linen. And floral patterned china is not my cup of tea, although the "Framboise Rose" doesn't scream floral- at least to me. I guess the reason is as simple as the fact that the china is really beautiful. That Van Day Truex designed it doesn't hurt either, although I didn't learn this tidbit of info until after I had fallen for the pattern.

I've culled a few images of the china
in situ. In almost every photo, the china has been placed on pink table linen. Way too sugary for me. I don't mind being in the pink, but this is just too rosy for me. I'd probably mix "Framboise Rose" with plain, masculine flatware and sleek crystal. And for the table linen, I'd choose a color or even a print that might give the china an edge. Can't you see it on a solid aubergine or prunelle linen cloth? What about mossy green? Even saffron might work. Maybe one of these days I'll get the chance to experiment with my very own "Framboise Rose".


"Framboise Rose" in the frescoed dining room of Earl Blackwell.



On the table of Mrs. Guilford Dudley, "Framboise Rose" holds court with Rock Cut crystal candlesticks and those fabulous (and famous) Baccarat decanters, both of which were also designed by Truex.


Denning and Fourcade must have liked the pattern too. As this is a mouthful, I'm going to quote: "A mahogany cellarette is placed before a trompe l'oeil window composed of a nineteenth-century Chinese panel painting whose summer palace garden is framed by lavish Napoleon III Aubusson tapestry portieres complete with deep valance and gold lace inner blind." Whew!


All that pink is excused here since it's a Valentine's Dinner. How extravagant to use those Peretti silver mesh scarf necklaces as napkin rings.

(Image #1 from The Tiffany Wedding; all others from The New Tiffany Table Settings; both books by John Loring)

14 comments:

  1. No more china for me either but I love it. This is beautiful. I'm with you...too much pink on the pink tableclothes. Would be beautiful on charcoal gray, black or choc. brown. Have a great week.

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  2. I love the quote "A mahogany cellarette is placed ...." - so 80s!

    As to the color of the tablecloth with that china, if I were to use one, it would be white linen damask, beautifully pressed and polished. Lots of silver and crystal mixed with raspberry glass. White candles, of course.

    Oh, dear. I think I'm revving up for giving a dinner party.

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  3. lovely pattern; not too floral as you suggest. So much beautiful stuff out there, I don't need any more either, doesn't stop me from trolling ebay though! It's an illness.

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  4. The beauty is mixing in a lively pattern like Framboise Rose with "gender neutral" china will create a much more lively tablescape and you don't need a full set to do it.

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  5. Such beauty...not enough words to express it!

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  6. As always, you have such a good eye! That pink is really spunky not at all too sticky sweet. I like the color balance best in the top photo with grege tablecloth and green apples; the pink settings are overkill for us today. Funny how taste changes.

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  7. Saffron cloth with the "Framboise" would be stunning--maybe a simple, but heavy, GeorgianSilver style flatware. Thanks for making me think in colors.

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  8. Beautiful dishes and crystal are my weakness I have 3 sets of china
    and I am old and now alone. I sold my Haviland limoge now I miss it and my daughter never forgave me for selling the race horse china.

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  9. I love china and use it often. I also love mixing my plain, but pretty china with a lovely pattern....allows for a variety of pieces!

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  10. Well, it all depends. After your third China pattern you are entitled to something just for sport. I am guilty of having more patterns than I care to admit, but table settings are a favorite hobby albeit an expensive and cumbersome one(you do need all that storage space)!it is a lovely pattern and very versatile. at one point, pink was the new black, no?. So I say if you like it and can afford it, go for it. You only live once!

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  11. Soo pretty! I would love to buy loads of different china patterns - there are so many I love - if only the wallet could afford them all!

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  12. Anonymous3:01 PM

    Those Private Stock patterns were all wonderful: Tiffany in its glory days.

    They still carry a few of them, and they run about a grand per plate.

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  13. FAB table settings!!

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  14. I'm rather taken with Mrs. Dudley's table. I think the floral cloth lends something to the china.

    I can relate to your predicament. Mrs.E. has threatened drastic action should I come home with more china.

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